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I imported a pre-built Avada website into a fresh installation of WordPress but was presented with the following warnings on the frontend when using the Avada theme.

  • Warning: Undefined array key “width” in /public_html/wp-content/themes/Avada/includes/class-avada-head.php on line 414
  • Warning: Undefined array key “height” in /public_html/wp-content/themes/Avada/includes/class-avada-head.php on line 415

I also received the following warning on the backend of WordPress.

  • Warning: Trying to access array offset on false in /home/customer/www/public_html/wp-content/themes/Avada/includes/lib/inc/redux/framework/FusionReduxCore/framework.php on line 2024

Troubleshooting the issues revealed that it may have been attributed to the SVG upload feature within the Avada theme.

I managed to clear up the issues by simply disabling and enabling the SVG upload feature. See instructions below.

 

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In this article I will show you how to quickly and easily add a script to your child theme functions.php file which will block access to the WP Admin bar and backend for anyone with the Subscriber role.

 

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Recently was not able to convince a client of the benefits of having me professionally manage, host and maintain their website for them. They wanted to save money and use GoDaddy’s Basic Managed WordPress service. So I had to migrate their completed demo over to it but ran into countless errors with GoDaddy’s hosting platform.

The GoDaddy migration tool was useless as was GoDaddy support. GoDaddy support insisted that I upgrade the server in order to complete the migration. But I only had delegated access to the clients account with no ability to purchase said upgrade because the client did not grant me those permissions.

Long story short, I was able to manually migrate their site over, even though we were on the Basic Managed WordPress server using the steps enumerated in this article.

This article is only for my personal use, to help jog my memory if another client want to migrate their site to a more affordable solution. Please do not use this article for migrating any of your or client sites. If you do, you take full responsibility for anything that goes wrong, or right for that matter.

 

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Recently had a client with a WordPress website in need of injecting a JavaScript tracking code into the Header. This would allow the injected JavaScript tracking code to appear within the header <head> of every page on their website. Newer WordPress themes usually provide an option to inject code into the either the header, body or footer areas but the client had a custom WordPress theme with no such feature or ability.

In this article I will show you how to quickly and easily add a script, JavaScript or any other custom code into the Header area of your WordPress website with or without a WordPress plugin.

 

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In this article I showcase a few simple code snippets to completely disable the WordPress commenting system.

 

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In this article I provide a simple function snippet to remove the titles Protected: and Private: from private or password protected pages in WordPress.

 

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Recently had a client with a WordPress website in need of injecting a JavaScript tracking code into the Footer. This would allow the injected JavaScript tracking code to appear towards the end of every page on their website. Newer WordPress themes usually provide an option to inject code into the either the header, body or footer areas but the client had a custom WordPress theme with no such feature or ability.

In this article I will show you how to quickly and easily add a script, JavaScript or any other custom code into the Footer area of your WordPress website with or without a WordPress plugin.

 

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Recently had a client with a WordPress website in need of injecting a JavaScript tracking code into the beginning part of the Body. This would allow the injected JavaScript tracking code to appear just after the <body> tag of every page on their website. Newer WordPress themes usually provide an option to inject code into the either the header, body or footer areas but the client had a custom WordPress theme with no such feature or ability.

In this article I will show you how to quickly and easily add a script, JavaScript or any other custom code into the Body area of your WordPress website with or without a WordPress plugin.

 

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Recently needed to implement a local development environment that used Apache, PHP and MySQL on Windows.

Years ago I played with WAMP server, which worked well. But the payload was large (1GB installer), system resource utilization high, and it required a number of outdated Microsoft Visual C++ versions to be installed in order to operate correctly. It was also very slow to use but it did work.

Local by Flywheel was slightly better but also very, very slow on a Windows computer. At least in my experience.

By far the best experience has been XAMPP. Granted, you have to run the installer as an administrator as well as its primary executables. But beyond that, it had a smaller installer and opening up a local WordPress installation is at least 4x faster than with Local by Flywheel. In short, for my personal needs the clear winner is XAMPP. Your experience may be different.

Within this article I have instructions and a video covering how I installed XAMPP on my Windows PC for quickly spinning up a WordPress installation for use in WordPress Plugin development.

 

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WordPress Admin Email Verification Prompt

WordPress 5.3 introduced a feature to periodically prompt (interrupt) site administrators to verify their site’s administration email address. This “feature”, which is scheduled to appear once every six (6) months, displays a screen to administrators upon logging in that requires they verify the site’s admin email address. However, this time based event appears to reset more frequently thus prompting more verification screens than originally intended.

In my opinion, this is not needed as any qualified WordPress site administrator would have access to the hosting account and MySQL database. Simply manually updating the admin_email record withing the wp_options table would resolve such an issue of email administration. This “feature” appears to be more of a patch for a disorganized developer who projected their disorganization onto the rest of the WordPress community.

In this article I will show you how to easily disable the WordPress “Administration email verification” page from interrupting you from logging into your WordPress web site.

 

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